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June 19 2013

NYTimes: Championing Women, a New League for Club Boxing Enters the Ring

More than 40 women are scheduled to compete in the United States Intercollegiate Boxing Association championships at the University of San Francisco. [via nytimes]

 

tickets: http://usfca.edu/koret/usiba/

 

[photo/foghorn]



NYTimes: Championing Women, a New League for Club Boxing Enters the Ring

More than 40 women are scheduled to compete in the United States Intercollegiate Boxing Association championships at the University of San Francisco. [via nytimes]

 

tickets: http://usfca.edu/koret/usiba/

 

[photo/foghorn]



Getting the Most out of Desk Space

Why desk space is important for an optimal workspace



Getting the Most out of Desk Space

Why desk space is important for an optimal workspace



Unicorn Theatre actors surmount 'The Mountaintop' in stunning MLK portrayal | examiner.com

Go in with an open mind; expect the unexpected; travel back 45 years to a different America, one divided mostly by race and prejudice in the days of the Civil Rights movement; and then focus on the man that led Black Americans out of social chains and darkness, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

 



Unicorn Theatre actors surmount 'The Mountaintop' in stunning MLK portrayal | examiner.com

Go in with an open mind; expect the unexpected; travel back 45 years to a different America, one divided mostly by race and prejudice in the days of the Civil Rights movement; and then focus on the man that led Black Americans out of social chains and darkness, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

 



June 17 2013

Marketing Automation: The Need for a Behavior-Based Program - Profs

Condensed...

 

Here are a few steps in the journey toward a buyer-centric automation strategy, which I like to call "behavioral marketing automation."

 

Segmenting, and Sending Messages, Based on Behavior: The first step of behavioral marketing automation is to determine which target audiences exhibit similar characteristics. Upon identifying clusters, you can send those groups relevant messages based on shared characteristics. Harnessing other factors related to context, like timeframe, can also boost the marketing relevance of your messages.

Driving Immediate Behavioral Messages: Once you've established your initial segments and clusters, you're ready to take things to the next level: letting contact behaviors take the wheel on an ongoing basis.

Why Behavioral Marketing, in the First Place? Sending individualized, targeted messages can seem like a daunting task, but with the Web tracking capabilities of modern marketing automation, this strategy has never been easier to execute. Moreover, why would you want to miss an opportunity to provide potential buyers with what they want, precisely when they want it?



Marketing Automation: The Need for a Behavior-Based Program - Profs

Condensed...

 

Here are a few steps in the journey toward a buyer-centric automation strategy, which I like to call "behavioral marketing automation."

 

Segmenting, and Sending Messages, Based on Behavior: The first step of behavioral marketing automation is to determine which target audiences exhibit similar characteristics. Upon identifying clusters, you can send those groups relevant messages based on shared characteristics. Harnessing other factors related to context, like timeframe, can also boost the marketing relevance of your messages.

Driving Immediate Behavioral Messages: Once you've established your initial segments and clusters, you're ready to take things to the next level: letting contact behaviors take the wheel on an ongoing basis.

Why Behavioral Marketing, in the First Place? Sending individualized, targeted messages can seem like a daunting task, but with the Web tracking capabilities of modern marketing automation, this strategy has never been easier to execute. Moreover, why would you want to miss an opportunity to provide potential buyers with what they want, precisely when they want it?



Advantages of Car Rentals

All your questions on car sharing and car share rental benefits in Singapore answered.


Advantages of Car Rentals

All your questions on car sharing and car share rental benefits in Singapore answered.


Evelyn Waugh's 'Scoop': Journalism Is A Duplicitous Business : NPR

The fictional tale about war correspondents will make you laugh till the person next to you on the subway thinks you have problems. It is also, according to writer Alexander Nazaryan, an all-too-real parody of the glory days of print journalism....In only a few years, a child will ask a parent about newspapers: What was their purpose? What did people do with them, and why? The parent, a little flummoxed, will explain that, long before biosensitive data aggregators simply uploaded information into the neurons of our frontal cortexes, people actually read the news by holding a piece of paper in front of their noses and scanning columns of text with their eyes. There were many such newspapers, to be read in the morning, over breakfast, and in the evening, over scotch. The newspapers competed with each other by sending actual people out into the actual world to report what had taken place, was going to take place — or, even, was alleged to have taken place but didn't. On days when there was little so-called news to report, the newspapers filled their pages with stories about, say, puppies who could recite Macbeth or people who wore jeggings to work. Also, there were crosswords.Of course, this fictional parent could give his/her fictional child Evelyn Waugh's Scoop — a fictional 1938 tale of British foreign correspondents reporting on a civil war in the fictional East African country of Ishmaelia. Fictional, yes, but to a journalist like myself, most everything about the novel is too real. Waugh was a master at mixing humor and pathos, as evidenced by his two most ambitious novels: A Handful of Dust and Brideshead Revisited. Scoop, on the other hand, is all laughter, of the sort that will make the person next to you on the subway think you have problems. Every time I read it, I miss the glory days of the ink-stained art — but also see why they have come to an end.Scoop is based on Waugh's own experience as a war correspondent in Ethiopia, where he reported for the Daily Mail on Mussolini's 1935 invasion. Lord Copper, owner of the Daily Beast — yes, that's where Tina Brown got the name for her own venture — decides to cover the socialist insurrection in Ishmaelia (which has the geography of Ethiopia and the history of Liberia) because, as he explains, "We think it a very promising little war." (One problematic aspect of the novel, it should be noted, is Waugh's crude treatment of Africans). Copper means to send the novelist John Courtney Boot, but a case of mistaken identity leads him to send William Boot, the newspaper's timid nature columnist, whom Waugh endows with one of the great lines of journalistic purple prose: "Feather-footed through the plashy fen passes the questing vole." Hemingway, he isn't. Hilarity ensues...



Evelyn Waugh's 'Scoop': Journalism Is A Duplicitous Business : NPR

The fictional tale about war correspondents will make you laugh till the person next to you on the subway thinks you have problems. It is also, according to writer Alexander Nazaryan, an all-too-real parody of the glory days of print journalism....In only a few years, a child will ask a parent about newspapers: What was their purpose? What did people do with them, and why? The parent, a little flummoxed, will explain that, long before biosensitive data aggregators simply uploaded information into the neurons of our frontal cortexes, people actually read the news by holding a piece of paper in front of their noses and scanning columns of text with their eyes. There were many such newspapers, to be read in the morning, over breakfast, and in the evening, over scotch. The newspapers competed with each other by sending actual people out into the actual world to report what had taken place, was going to take place — or, even, was alleged to have taken place but didn't. On days when there was little so-called news to report, the newspapers filled their pages with stories about, say, puppies who could recite Macbeth or people who wore jeggings to work. Also, there were crosswords.Of course, this fictional parent could give his/her fictional child Evelyn Waugh's Scoop — a fictional 1938 tale of British foreign correspondents reporting on a civil war in the fictional East African country of Ishmaelia. Fictional, yes, but to a journalist like myself, most everything about the novel is too real. Waugh was a master at mixing humor and pathos, as evidenced by his two most ambitious novels: A Handful of Dust and Brideshead Revisited. Scoop, on the other hand, is all laughter, of the sort that will make the person next to you on the subway think you have problems. Every time I read it, I miss the glory days of the ink-stained art — but also see why they have come to an end.Scoop is based on Waugh's own experience as a war correspondent in Ethiopia, where he reported for the Daily Mail on Mussolini's 1935 invasion. Lord Copper, owner of the Daily Beast — yes, that's where Tina Brown got the name for her own venture — decides to cover the socialist insurrection in Ishmaelia (which has the geography of Ethiopia and the history of Liberia) because, as he explains, "We think it a very promising little war." (One problematic aspect of the novel, it should be noted, is Waugh's crude treatment of Africans). Copper means to send the novelist John Courtney Boot, but a case of mistaken identity leads him to send William Boot, the newspaper's timid nature columnist, whom Waugh endows with one of the great lines of journalistic purple prose: "Feather-footed through the plashy fen passes the questing vole." Hemingway, he isn't. Hilarity ensues...



June 05 2013

How Smartphones Are Trying to Replace Your Doctor (But Can't Yet)

For most of time medicine was a guessing game. Doctors, or witch doctors, or shaman would inspect a patient, stir a potion and hope it would work. With some notable exceptions, modern medicine isn't so different. The data collection—blood pressure, heart rate, weight, reflexes—is largely rudimentary. We're getting by, but technology can take us so much further.

 

Even technology that fits in your pocket.

 

In the past year or two (or three) iPhones and iPads have been a fixture in doctors' offices around the world. Why carry a clipboard when you could pull up records via Wi-Fi and type the information directly into the patient's medical record? Perhaps even more powerful is the idea that these devices can be collecting data all the time.

 

Smartphones are incredibly powerful tools for anything as simple as data mining to something so sophisticated as measuring a patient's sleeping pattern. There are apps that can help regulate your mental health, apps that can help you keep track of what and how much you eat. There are apps that can take your blood pressure and you blood sugar. There are even apps that help you cope with aging.

 

While an app can't cure a disease, some of the newer, more experimental medical apps can do truly extraordinary things. This technology can not only help you feel better; it can prevent illness by spotting symptoms early on.

 

How Smartphones Are Trying to Replace Your Doctor (But Can't Yet)

For most of time medicine was a guessing game. Doctors, or witch doctors, or shaman would inspect a patient, stir a potion and hope it would work. With some notable exceptions, modern medicine isn't so different. The data collection—blood pressure, heart rate, weight, reflexes—is largely rudimentary. We're getting by, but technology can take us so much further.

 

Even technology that fits in your pocket.

 

In the past year or two (or three) iPhones and iPads have been a fixture in doctors' offices around the world. Why carry a clipboard when you could pull up records via Wi-Fi and type the information directly into the patient's medical record? Perhaps even more powerful is the idea that these devices can be collecting data all the time.

 

Smartphones are incredibly powerful tools for anything as simple as data mining to something so sophisticated as measuring a patient's sleeping pattern. There are apps that can help regulate your mental health, apps that can help you keep track of what and how much you eat. There are apps that can take your blood pressure and you blood sugar. There are even apps that help you cope with aging.

 

While an app can't cure a disease, some of the newer, more experimental medical apps can do truly extraordinary things. This technology can not only help you feel better; it can prevent illness by spotting symptoms early on.

 

Ageing baby boomers, boost to Singapore businesses

Singapore ranked third out of 15 Asia Pacific countries in the first ever Ageing Asia Silver Economy Index – and that signals a welcome boost to business.


Ageing baby boomers, boost to Singapore businesses

Singapore ranked third out of 15 Asia Pacific countries in the first ever Ageing Asia Silver Economy Index – and that signals a welcome boost to business.


Linking Empathy to Health, Green-living, and Peace

Lesa Walker discusses how she has implemented a unique empathy-driven project in schools across the United States and in Ghana.

 

I looked to the research about positive psychology, happiness and empathy and noticed several cross-cutting themes.  There is power to effect positive change through simple, effective techniques such as increasing our daily positive intentional awareness, expressing our gratitude, holding positive thoughts in our minds and daily journaling.  I created the Olymp-i-a Challenge, utilizing these techniques to engage people in the practice of positive ideas and actions for health, green-living and peace.  The “i” and the “a” in “Olymp-i-a” stand for positive “ideas” and “actions.”... 

 

Empathy is expressed in many of the students’ daily ideas and actions.  They talk about helping another person or animal or helping clean up or recycle. "

 

By Lesa Walker



Linking Empathy to Health, Green-living, and Peace

Lesa Walker discusses how she has implemented a unique empathy-driven project in schools across the United States and in Ghana.

 

I looked to the research about positive psychology, happiness and empathy and noticed several cross-cutting themes.  There is power to effect positive change through simple, effective techniques such as increasing our daily positive intentional awareness, expressing our gratitude, holding positive thoughts in our minds and daily journaling.  I created the Olymp-i-a Challenge, utilizing these techniques to engage people in the practice of positive ideas and actions for health, green-living and peace.  The “i” and the “a” in “Olymp-i-a” stand for positive “ideas” and “actions.”... 

 

Empathy is expressed in many of the students’ daily ideas and actions.  They talk about helping another person or animal or helping clean up or recycle. "

 

By Lesa Walker



April 25 2013

joannakojx
joannakojx
Reposted frombethgadar bethgadar viaAvisCaldwe AvisCaldwe
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